Luis Alberto Urrea
From Tijuana to the World
January 13, 2017

•  Award-Winning Author, Poet & Essayist

•  2005 Pulitzer Prize Finalist for Nonfiction

•  Creative Writing Professor: University of Illinois-Chicago

Urrea

Acclaimed writer Luis Alberto Urrea uses his dual-culture life experiences to explore greater themes of love, loss and triumph.  Born in Tijuana, Mexico, to a Mexican father and an American mother, Urea’s humble beginning to Pulitzer Prize finalist and beloved storyteller is a story in itself.  Author of 14 best-selling books and publications in all major genres, he has had three of his books chosen by 30 cities and colleges for the One Book community reading programs – Into the Beautiful North, The Devil’s Highway and The Hummingbird’s Daughter. 

In 2016, Turner Network TV (TNT) has acquired Pulitzer nominated, award-winning author’s Luis Alberto Urrea’s adventurous novel Into The Beautiful North to develop into an epic television series.

Magic City Books/Tulsa Literary Coalition suggests the following titles as complimentary reading selections for this season’s speakers. All titles are available at the library. Visit www.tulsalibrary.org to access the catalog.

Luis Alberto Urrea: “From Tijuana to the World”

The award-winning Urrea has written in many literary genres, below are selections that represent his nonfiction, novels, and short stories.

The Devil’s Highway: A True Story (2004). Describes the attempt of twenty-six men to cross the Mexican border into the desert of southern Arizona, a region known as the Devil’s Highway, detailing their harrowing ordeal and battle for survival against impossible odds.

The Hummingbird’s Daughter (2005). When sixteen-year-old Teresita, the illegitimate and beloved daughter of a powerful late-nineteenth-century rancher, arises from death possessing the power to heal, she is declared a saint and finds her family and faith tested by the impending Mexican civil war.

The Water Museum: Stories (2015). A short story collection that examines the borders between nations and between people, including the Edgar-winning “Amapola” and his now classic “Bid Farewell to Her Many Horses.”